Monday, July 14, 2014

Don't let them CRAP on your ART!


Sometimes people crap on your art and they don't even know it. Sometimes they crap on your art and they know it but they think they're helping...and sometimes the angry, sad, and discouraged crap on your art because they want company - don't let them.

Many people have good intentions but because they haven't accomplished anything with their art - OR - they aren't artists they think they can help you by encouraging you to take a different path or quit altogether. The problem with taking advice from a non-artist is they don't understand what it feels like to create something. They don't understand the joy and emotional high you get from creating something better than you've ever created before. They don't understand that you will be depressed if you aren't expressing your creativity and working hard on improving your craft.

Words can inspire and words can kill your spirit. Surround yourself with positive people. Let them know that you're smart - you understand how hard it is to pursue a career in art - you don't need them to tell you about the perils - you need them to encourage you - if you need to take time off for a job or project that pays bills you'll do it without them telling you to.

Once in class I made some comments that I really thought were encouraging and the student I was talking to changed majors the next day. It might be for the better - time will tell and we each have a different journey but it reinforced the sacred responsibility we have towards each other. Be positive. Be helpful. Be an inspiration to your friends and they'll return the favor.

15 comments:

  1. You speak good words as always, Will Terry!! :)

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  2. Okay, I'll go first. Will, you are an amazing, gifted genius and a generous, empathetic friend. I always value our time together and I always leave our meetings a better, happier, uplifted person. If I could bottle and sell your drive, passion, and work ethic, I would be a billionaire! You are a valued treasure to the creative industry.

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    1. LOL Randy - check is in the mail :) ...thanks buddy!

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  3. Indeed. I do respect my friends and family giving such advice of getting a job to support myself while trying to get my artwork and writing off the ground, but you also need time to build and grow as an artist to be an artist. It is the same for any job field. Though, sometimes you do need to take that part-time or full-time other jobs to pay the bills, but it is better to do it on your terms accepting it than grudgingly doing so due to family pushing ya. You'll probably find a job you'll at least somewhat like if you go into the job search understanding it is just a stepping stone to your real career with going into it with a happier mindset.

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  4. Well said. I started to dislike to try to explain to non-artists what I do and why, usually they don't understand why someone can stick so long to something without being financial sucessful, and sometimes they don't get the process at all. I assume it is related to the post you've made some months earlier about how art is teached in school and how it is treated usually.
    Thanks again.

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  5. Words can build up or tear down...you said it all, Will. I love this post. Thanks for sharing the encouragement. It means a lot. :)

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  6. Great post, as always very genuine and encouraging :)

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  7. I find other artists are often the most hurtful when it comes to criticism. There is the usual back ground noise of "art isn't a proper job" from people in general, which is wearing. But I find it worst when another artist tries to shoot you down.

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  8. As always...a good post and very encouraging. I always come to you Will when I need a good spark followed by a helping hand. Good words...good words.

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  9. Thank you everyone for all of the kind words - I love lending a hand where I can...

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  10. Wow..You must have been reading my mind! So perfectly said. It's a tough road, but we all know it. That being said, how do you get the inspiration for a character like this? Simple, but not! If you know what I mean? Always an inspiration Will!

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    1. I started with a simple idea - somethng bad happening to someon's prized posession. Then I thought I'll make it a troll or goblin character since that would be ironic - something bad happening to a bad character. The lollypop was funny because you never see a goblin with a huge lollypop. and the bird popped into my head at the end. The lollypop wasn't looking good at all until I ditched the opaque look I was going for qnd went with the translucent look you see now.......I think a lot about what I'm going to draw - while in the shower, meetings, etc.

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  11. Some months ago, my sister (who is making subtitles professionally), puts on facebook a youtube a video of her work. It was a crappy Telenovela with awful acting, but with her subtitles. As you suspect, no one acknowledged her or said anything, because no one could really understand what she did and relate to it. Also, how do you evaluate such a thing? I went on saying that it was a nice job, but she felt overall disappointed because people did not see her effort, expertise and more than anything, her pride in her work.

    I am a beginner in illustration and i know the feeling. Though i believe it is not about only artists or creatives, more about something deeper which i would call "being seen".

    I believe that we crave all for getting people to truly understand us, though i believe it is only possible until a certain point. You can really never grasp how much something is important for someone, at least exactly the way the person feels about it. Which is great, because i would hate to be the exact doppelganger of someone.

    We would like people to always have the best words to say to us, but it is not often the case, which is why we have the concept of intention. Though as you say, even good intentions can lead to bad results, so what can we do about it?
    This is where people also have to make an effort to try to see the good thing in what they think to be negative. We have to understand that if a person can't understand us, the reciprocity is true too. For a person, saying that your work is great will mean that it is truly awesome.

    I live in Norway, and the tendency is like such. People don't overjoy or use superlatives that much. Though when they tell you it is good, it is reaaaally good for them :D.

    Trying to understand each other's language is the key. By language, I don't mean only the words we use, but the power we put into them. My "love" is not the same as yours, and not the one of another. Which is also the reason why everyone is unique: we all see the world from the window of our own soul, with our own codes, culture and perceptions.

    There are moments when i paint things that make me vibrate and even cry, and i can tell you how horrible it is when no one sees it. It is like if i had just said the most beautiful thing in my life, and no one responds to it. It can be heartbreaking. It is exactly like when you were at school fondly in love with someone. One day you manage to gather all your courage to say your love and you end up with a no or worse (a laughter).

    In the end, it is not really about finding people that do the same as you, but people that will take the time to understand you and try to see the things in their entirety. Not only the good, but the bad too. Critics on your work should always speak of both. Nothing can be entirely good or entirely bad, if someone just say a one sided opinion, do not trust her judgement entirely and keep in mind that there is positive yet unsaid stuff.

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    1. and i did not even spoke about empathy ^^

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  12. So true! So hilarious! So re-blogged! Thanks...Sherry

    http://sherrykey.wordpress.com/2014/08/05/featured-artist-dont-let-them-crap-on-your-art-by-will-terry/

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